Posts tagged ‘meat’

2017, February 17

Recipe of the Month: Chili with a hint of Carne

While still on holiday in the first week of January, aside from catching up with doing laundry, I started cleaning out the fridge and pantry with the purpose of using up everything that was more or less about to go off.
I made tuna salad with left-over veggies, oven-baked Falafel since I found chickpeas and wanted to try the recipe, diced some red peppers and thinly sliced a leek popping them in the freezer for some future stir fry I’ll be making, and cut up some overripe bananas to freeze for smoothies.

I also found a can of white beans in tomato sauce, and thought about later going out and buying ground meat to cook Chili. Most Chili recipes I’ve seen, require the same amount of beans and meat. However, that is not something I’d eat, so I always cook the dish for my boyfriend alone.
Given I was in cleaning-mode and rummaged more through the freezer, I found some left-over meat paddies I’ve thrown in there from the previous week when we’ve made homemade cheese burgers, and I decided to only use those in the recipe and see what comes out of it. Well, the finished dish tasted wonderful, so that is how Chili with a hint of Carne was born.

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Chili with a hint of Carne

pinch of salt
pinch of black pepper
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp chili powder
1 vegetable cube
1 beef cube
2-3 garlic cloves
1 tsp oregano
2 tbsp olive oil
1 medium red onion
100-150 grams ground beef meat
1 can white beans in tomato sauce (415 grams)

Add the olive oil, the seasonings, the vegetable and beef cubes (I used Knorr), together with the diced onion and minced garlic into a pan, and saute them until the onion is translucent.

Stir in the meat, and let it cook through, stirring every once in a while to that the meat doesn’t stick to your pan.

Once the meat is cooked, add in the can of beans, and cook for another ten to fifteen minutes (depends on the beans, so check the instructions on the can), until all the flavors come together.

When it was done, I added some of it into small jars to serve over pasta as you would a sauce, and into the rest of it, I stirred some steamed rice. Both versions tasted great!

Bon appétit! ;)

2016, November 18

Recipe of the Month: Chicken Paprikash

I have only now made this delicious Hungarian stew for the first time since my boyfriend and I are together. After tasting it, having lunch and asking for seconds, too, he asked why I’ve never cooked this before. Truthfully? I haven’t thought about it.

My grandmother used to make Chicken Paprikash in a different variation which I don’t really like, and my mom used to make the below version with basically any part of the chicken, except chicken breast. Mostly because in my country, chicken breast is more expensive than thighs, legs or wings (let me know if it’s different where you live), so chicken breast wasn’t always an option.
In my honest opinion, the different parts of chicken do taste differently, and now I prefer chicken breast. But until recently, I haven’t thought of trying this particular recipe with it. I am so happy my mom suggested it though, the recipe is absolutely perfect this way!

csirke-paprikas

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Chicken Paprikash (Csirke Paprikás)

1 chicken breast
olive oil
salt, black pepper (to taste)
2-3 teaspoons sweet Paprika spice
2 teaspoons fresh parsley
2 bulbs of garlic (about 20-25 cloves)
2-4 tablespoons flour (depending how thick you want the sauce)
2 tablespoons sour cream
0,8 liter water

Start by cutting up your chicken breast into small pieces.
Add a little olive oil into a larger pot, add in the chicken, and season to taste with the salt, black pepper and the sweet Paprika (I only used one teaspoon of Paprika since I don’t like it that much, but it was enough for giving the dish a nice taste). Stir until the chicken turns white all over, then cover with the water and leave to simmer.

After the chicken is cooked, remove it onto a plate from the chicken stock and set it aside.

Into a glass add the flour, the sour cream, and a few tablespoons of the still-hot chicken stock (because if you add cold sour cream to a hot liquid it will curdle), then mix it as well as possible to avoid the flour forming lumps. Strain this mixture into the chicken broth on low heat, stir well and let it thicken to a sauce.
Once thickened, add the chicken pieces back and some parsley to taste. Stir a few more times, then turn off the stove and you’re done.

The traditional Chicken Paprikash is served with Nokedli (dumpling-like boiled egg noodles), which I dislike. So instead, I serve my version of this Hungarian recipe with rice, mashed potatoes or bread. Feel free to have sauerkraut or pickles with it.

Usually, I make double the amount of sauce for this recipe. After the chicken is eaten with as much sauce as everyone wants, I make some macaroni or penne pasta and use some of the Paprikash sauce on that. I love it!

PS: I usually wash fresh parsley, place it in small plastic baggies and store them in the freezer. Other greens as well, such as basil, oregano, dill, etc. After frozen, they’re really simple to cut into really thin stripes, when cooking. They’re perfect for having “fresh” greens instead of dried over the Winter as they taste way better.

Bon appétit! ;)

2016, July 15

Recipe of the Month: Savory Pork Cutlets over Caramelized Onions

As much as possible I try to eat lean meat, or depending on the type of meat maybe semi-trimmed. Below is a recipe I make at least every two-three weeks, because it’s so easy to make and absolutely delicious served with either a side of rice or baked potatoes!

page Savory Pork Cutlets over Caramelized Onions

Savory Pork Cutlets over Caramelized Onions

8 slices of pork cutlet
3 large onions
half a lemon’s juice
French Spiced Salt
A pinch of salt, white pepper
Olive Oil

Add a splash of Olive Oil into a large pan lined with baking paper.
Cut the onions crosswise into thin slices, so they fall apart when added into the pan. Season with a pinch of salt and white pepper. Sprinkle with the juice of half a lemon.
Set the pan aside.

Season the pork cutlets on both sides with French Spiced Salt. Place them on top of the onions. Spray a little Olive Oil on top of the meat, if you wish. Cover the pan with aluminum foil.

Cook in a preheated oven at low-to-medium heat setting for about 40 minutes, turning the slices over at least once during the cooking process. Take the aluminum foil off after turning the slices over.

If you’re cooking at medium heat, toss the onions a little, too, so they don’t get burnt. This step is not necessary at a low heat setting.
Optionally, in the last 10 minutes of cooking, feel free to scoop some onions on top of the cutlets.

Making more traditional caramelized onions can be time-consuming, which is why I love the above method a lot more. It also keeps the meat from drying out while cooking.

Optional: Sometimes I like adding other vegetables into the mix as well, which I cut into thin slices or chop and place on top of the onions, then place the meat on top. You will need to stir the vegetables when turning over the cutlets.

Bon appétit! ;)

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